High Fiber Diet-The Bellevue Arts Museum’s Biennial

Today I thought I would post a blog version of my Facebook post about the Bellevue Arts Museum Show. My Facebook artist page was a good place for me to start wrestling with my notions of social networking, but I now think I am ready to focus my energy here. So, I will be moving some of my favorite posts from there to here.

My quilts have traveled to shows in a lot of places–all over the United States and to Japan and Europe as well. But because we live in Alaska, and because we have three boys, I never go with the quilts.

In my December 28, 2012 post, I wrote about getting the quilts made and to the show. Today’s entry is really a photo essay of the work featured in the exhibit. I hope you are inspired by this work as much as I am. Just so you know, this is the Bellevue Arts Museum’s second Biennial. It features the work of 44 North West artist who are working fiber.

The big wall of artists participating in the show.

The big wall of artists participating in the show.

Here is Stefano Catalani, the Director of Curatorial Affairs, talking about the show and announcing the John & Joyce Award of Excellence. If you look closely, you can see me on the big screen.

Here is Stefano Catalani, the Director of Curatorial Affairs, talking about the show and announcing the John & Joyce Award of Excellence. If you look closely, you can see me on the big screen.IMG_1260

Here is a close up and full of the John & Joyce Price Award of Excellence. The work was created by Nate Steigenga.
Here is a close up and full view of the John & Joyce Price Award of Excellence. The work was created by Nate Steigenga.IMG_1255

This is Tamara Wilson's work. She is other artist representing Alaska in this Northwest regional show. She lives in Fairbanks. For her piece she essentially sewed her sewing room.
This is Tamara Wilson’s work. She is the other artist representing Alaska in this Northwest regional show. She lives in Fairbanks. She essentially sewed her sewing room. I like it.

Howard and Lorraine Barlow each had pieces in the show. This one is Once in a Blue Moon created by Howard. The piece is made of more than 1000 shot gun shells each of which are loaded with Lorraine’s deconstructed wedding dress. All of that is interesting, but what I like best is the way the color and placement of the shot gun shells vibrates on the wall.
Howard and Lorraine Barlow each had pieces in the show. This one is Once in a Blue Moon created by Howard. The piece is made of more than 1000 shot gun shells each of which are loaded with Lorraine’s deconstructed wedding dress. All of that is interesting, but what I like best is the way the color and placement of the shot gun shells vibrates on the wall.

IMG_1343

Two amazing pieces that I did not get the full information about. I won't do that again.

Two amazing pieces that I did not get the full information about. I won’t do that again.

Rachel Meginnes's Untitled. This was one of Nancy's favorites.

Rachel Meginnes’s Untitled. This was one of Nancy’s favorites.

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This is Margie Livingston’s work. These pieces of “fiber” are made entirely  from acrylic paint. Beautiful to look at, but very difficult to sew.

This is Margie Livingston’s work. These pieces of “fiber” are made entirely from acrylic paint. Beautiful to look at, but very difficult to sew.

Polly Adams Sutton's Facing the Unexpected.


Polly Adams Sutton’s Facing the Unexpected.

Paul Komada's Tower of US is a knitted tribute to the Occupy Wall Street Movement.

Paul Komada’s Tower of US is a knitted tribute to the Occupy Wall Street Movement.

Paul Komada's Tower of US is a knitted tribute to the Occupy Wall Street Movement.

Paul Komada’s Tower of US is a knitted tribute to the Occupy Wall Street Movement.

Jan Hopkins' piece Oh Eleanor. This is one of my favorites.It is made from fruit fiber including grapefruit and cantaloupe peels, and gingko leaves. If there were an award for the piece that truly is about a high fiber diet--this one would win.

Jan Hopkins’ piece Oh Eleanor. This is one of my favorites.It is made from fruit fiber including grapefruit and cantaloupe peels, and gingko leaves. If there were an award for the piece that truly is about a high fiber diet–this one would win.

Here is color Grids with people milling around in front of it. Maybe if there was BIG award I would get it. I can't tell you how much fun it was to see those pieces all hanging together.

Here is color Grids with people milling around in front of it. Maybe if there was BIG award I would get it. I can’t tell you how much fun it was to see those pieces all hanging together.

Anne Johnston's work. In 2005, I took a week of classes with Anne Johnston learning how to dye fabric. It was a pivotal moment in my life--I had been living in Valdez at the time and had no idea artists were doing such amazing things with fiber.

Anne Johnston’s work. In 2005, I took a week of classes with Anne Johnston learning how to dye fabric. It was a pivotal moment in my life–I had been living in Valdez at the time and had no idea artists were doing such amazing things with fiber.

"Jo

This is David Chatt's piece called Bedside Table. Each of these objects were found in his father's bedside table when he passed away. David cover all of them with beads. Wow. Makes my obsessive compulsive stitching seem quite normal.

This is David Chatt’s piece called Bedside Table. Each of these objects were found in his father’s bedside table when he passed away. David cover all of them with beads. Wow. Makes my obsessive compulsive stitching seem quite normal.

IMG_1366

The opening included a DJ, and band, and even several arial artists. They know how to celebrate at the BAM.This lady is VERY fit.

The opening included a DJ, and band, and even several arial artists. They know how to celebrate at the BAM.
This lady is VERY fit.

IMG_1381

Walt Tague, Nancy Cook, and myself after an amazing evening at the opening.

Walt Tague, Nancy Cook, and myself after an amazing evening at the opening.

This entry was published on January 2, 2013 at 8:59 PM. It’s filed under Art in Place and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

6 thoughts on “High Fiber Diet-The Bellevue Arts Museum’s Biennial

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