Jimi Makes a Quilt

Last fall, I wanted to make an election Color Grid quilt, but I ran out of time. I had the proto-type–my initial sketch of the quilt–but I failed to follow through.

Here is the beginning of Jimi Makes a Quilt

Here is the beginning of Jimi Makes a Quilt

This week with my newly reconfigured studio I was ready. Last week I finished This Quilt is Technotronic, and this week it was Jimi Makes a Quilt.

I don’t want to speak too soon, but I kinda think I am on a roll here.

This is the palette for the Jimi. When I select a palette, I try to incorporate as many different types of cotton fabrics as possible. My stash includes fabrics from the 1930s onward, fabrics I have hand-dyed (and some hand dyes that nice people have given me), as well as contemporary commercial cottons. I love them all.

This palette includes three vintage prints, three contemporary prints, two solids, and one hand-dyed.

This palette includes three vintage prints, three contemporary prints, two solids, and one hand-dyed.

This vintage fabric was a very good find, and I am excited to use it in this quilt. It looks like it was made for the 1976 election.

This vintage fabric was a very good find, and I am excited to use it in this quilt. It looks like it was made for the 1976 election. Jimmy Carter is my favorite president. No wars under his watch. But this quilt is named for a different  Jimi.

I went through a period, I think I should call the solid years, when I didn’t work with prints.  I suppose it had to do with being a student of Nancy Crow’s–I learned so much from her. And now I am psyched to take that knowledge and go in my own direction. I am ready to combine my years of mastering traditional quilt skills with the composition and color skills I gained from studying with Nancy Crow.

When you work with prints one of the most difficult things to do is to get the print to line up on a seam line. One way to make that happen is to miter the seam. Here is how I do that. For clarity purposes, when I say strip I am referring to the fabric you are attaching to the block.When I say block I am referring to the fabric you have already pieced. The block is a block  shape. The strip is a strip shape. I also realized as I was writing this that I need to create a post about how I cut strips. This will happen another day.

Yes, this is tedious work. But if it creates the look I want, I am willing to do it.

Once all the of blocks are made it is time to start building the grid. The grid for Jimi is not nearly as complex as the one I built for Technotronic.

I hope some of you can use my tips on mitering prints in your own projects. I’d love to see what you come up with.

As always, I am adding this post to Nina-Marie’s Off the Wall Friday blog. Check it out. I am always amazed at the fun stuff artists working with fiber are doing.

This entry was published on March 29, 2013 at 6:44 PM. It’s filed under My Process-Quilts and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

7 thoughts on “Jimi Makes a Quilt

  1. Pingback: Four Ways to Cut Fabric | Maria Shell

  2. This is a stunning quilt. I love the detail you have given this post- I am sure I will be studying your method, very helpfully presented. Thanks fro taking the time to write it. And I love seeing the grid take shape! What a process!

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  3. wow – the fussy cutting on this is crazy cool! love the use of pattern and how it makes such a bold statement! Remember to share your newly configured studio next week on the studio link up!

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  4. Thank you Nina-Marie. I am looking forward to your studio link up. My husband is making me a table that’s a knock of yours. Can’t wait for the unveiling of your new space!

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  5. I can see why your work is so fabulous – you spend a lot of time and talent getting it there. love seeing all those works in progress. wheeee, design wall one with the arcs is amazing especially since it’s combined with one of my favorite of your motifs – the plus.

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