Field Sketching with Kristin Link

I can’t believe it has been almost a month since I attended Kristin Link’s Field Sketching Class, but that is just how summer flies. Last summer, I wrote about participating in Kristin’s Mountain Arts for Youth program at the Wrangell Mountains Center.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkDuring that afternoon class, the kids (and curious adults like me) learned some of Kristin’s basic techniques for drawing and using water colors.

After my semi-successful attempt at drawing Yarrow, I knew I really could benefit from a longer class with Kristin Link.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkMaria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkThe class this June was small which meant we had plenty of room to spread out and we got lots of attention from Kristin.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkMaria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkWe started the first full day by learning about observational drawing–I think of this as Looking Closely. My two favorite exercises were drawing my hand. Here is my first attempt.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkAnd then my second. Here we were to sketch lightly which is hard for me to do.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkAnd finally my third. It truly is amazing how quickly I improved.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkI also enjoyed blind drawing. Here you look at what you are drawing but not at the page. Here are my portraits of Lona using this method.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkMaria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkKristin introduced the tools we would be using. Water color brushes with water in them. I love these. Scrap pieces of water color paper to test our colors. Water Color paints and ink. There were other tools too, but I stuck to the basics.

We searched nearby to find leaves that interested us and made our first attempt at sketching, painting, and overlaying ink on top.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkFrom there we ventured out into the field. What a field eh?

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkHere we are sketching.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkAt first I just wanted to draw rocks.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkI was really looking forward to mixing all those browns and grays. This was very much in my comfort zone. I draw these rocks all the time with thread.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkBut Kristin convinced me to try something a bit more adventuresome. I picked Dryas. Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkIt is a favorite plant around here. Dryas is what is known as a succession plant. As the glacier recedes, Dryas shows up on the scene to provide nutrients to the soil and get other things growing.

Here is the work I did in the field. I know now that I was taking on too much. I needed to focus on getting the basics down, instead of trying to great weird figure ground relationships.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkThis part wasn’t too bad.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkBack at the Wrangell Mountain Center, we continued our work. The goal was to create a page for a field sketching journal. I kept wondering why my colors were not blending well, Kristin pointed out that I was not using water color paper! URGH. I won’t make that mistake again.

Maria Shell Field Sketching with Kristin LinkThe next day, Kristin demonstrated some very useful techniques for drawing animals. I was surprised at the results.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkField Sketching with Kristin LinkFrom there we went up to Kennicott to learn more about drawing landscapes. Both the lessons–drawing animals and landscapes–were useful, but I decided to stick with the plants for now. I needed to get my page of the field sketching journal done. I am glad I did. Here is the finished journal. Isn’t it a beauty?

Here is my Prickly Rose in color. As you can tell, I like patchworking the color.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkField Sketching with Kristin LinkField Sketching with Kristin LinkLast weekend, I returned to my unfinished work. The problem with sketching live plants and leaves is that after several weeks they die.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkMy Dryas aka Baby Einstein went ahead and bloomed on me.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkStill I did manage to finish my dryas. I feel that my paint mixing was not as good as it had been during the workshop. I’m not sure why. It is much heavier than I would like.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkField Sketching with Kristin LinkAnd here are a couple of field sketches that I have yet to paint.

Field Sketching with Kristin LinkField Sketching with Kristin LinkThis was an amazing experience. Kristin is an amazing teacher. I hope you will all take a minute to really take a look at the work she does.  It was a great art stretch.

This entry was published on July 17, 2014 at 3:54 PM. It’s filed under Just Plain Stories and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

7 thoughts on “Field Sketching with Kristin Link

  1. Nysha Nelson on said:

    I love your sketches! And the patchwork leaves are SO cool! Your blind contours are really REALLY good. Stitchers are really good spatially! Loads of practice. Keep up the sketching?!

    Like

  2. Maria..these drawings are great! You should keep on doing more!(in your spare time) 🙂

    Like

  3. mark vail on said:

    great entry, enjoyed your work and want to take the course when it is offered next time.

    Like

  4. pmgarrett2 on said:

    fun!

    Date: Thu, 17 Jul 2014 23:55:13 +0000 To: pmgarrett@hotmail.com

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: